Streams

This Book is Overdue!

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Marilyn Johnson explains how librarians can help us manage the myriad sources of information available to us —from paper and discs, books, e-books, and thumb drives. Her book This Book is Overdue! How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All smashes the stereotypes of librarians and shows how they’re pragmatic idealists who fuse the tools of the digital age with their love for the written word and free speech.

Events: Marilyn Johnson will be reading and signing books
Wednesday, February 24, at 7:00 pm
Barnes & Noble, Upper West Side
2289 Broadway, at 82nd Street

Marilyn Johnson will be reading and signing books
Thursday, February 25, at 7:00 pm
Brooklyn Public Library
10 Grand Army Plaza
Brooklyn, NY

Guests:

Marilyn Johnson

Comments [14]

edith rae brown from ny

What is the name of the Memoir that your guest spoke about yesterday. I believe it had to do with music. Thanks

Dec. 14 2010 05:30 PM
John D. Berry from Berkeley, CA

@Tom who said, "So many stacks are off limits now. Isn't Google the closest we have to that now (but without the texture and feel of beautiful books)?"

Tom, closed stacks are more the exception than the rule.

In collections where the stacks have been closed, usually there has been excessive vandalism; just in case anyone wondered where all those lovely plates and prints people love to buy in antique shops have come from...

John, U.C. Berkeley Librarian

Feb. 26 2010 12:08 PM
Alycia from Brooklyn

Help from a local librarian who happened to catch the show today:

@Hank from Brooklyn:

Check out Project Gutenberg, an online project that collects and shares ebooks in the public domain
http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page

Similarly there is Librivox, a collaborative website where anyone can read and record books from Project Gutenberg and share the recorded audiobooks online
http://librivox.org/

Feb. 24 2010 05:20 PM
Akritas Smith from Brooklyn NY

Libraries are our plazas, our squares, our community links. Our librarians in the Bay Ridge Brooklyn Public Library are saints.
They put up with a lot of '' no library '' matters on a daily basis.

We thank them but mostly we love and appreciate them.

Akritas

Feb. 24 2010 12:56 PM
tom from qns

I used to love wandering the stacks at the old library at my University: in the Art section I would find: Degas next to Daumier, Design, DelSarto, Drawing animals...So many stacks are off limits now. Isn't google the closest we have to that now (but without the texture and feel of beautiful books)?

Feb. 24 2010 12:55 PM
Hank from Brooklyn

Are there any plans to partner with Kindle or other e-book providers to make books, at least public domain books, available online for a small fee and share the revenue. Books would never be out of circulation.

Feb. 24 2010 12:55 PM
Nick from NYC


Leonard - The FBI etc have a long history of nosing around in people's library records (unless they are kept out by pro-active laws that protect our privacy - which by the way were torpedoed by the Patriot Act)

Feb. 24 2010 12:53 PM
tom from qns

I used to love wandering the stacks at the old library at my University: in the Art section I would find: Degas next to Daumier, Design, Del Sarto, Drawing animals...So many stacks are off limits now. Isn't google the closest we have to that now (but without the texture and feel of beautiful books)?

Feb. 24 2010 12:52 PM
Theresa from Brooklyn

I wish there was more "shushing" in libraries these days. Libraries did not have to become noisy to stay relevant, and esecially in this noisy culture, people still need quiet places to read, work and reflect.

Feb. 24 2010 12:51 PM
ted from manhattan

cybrarian actually comes from "cyber" and "arian" NOT "librarian." consider an agrarian, antiquarian, humanitarian, vegetarian as well as librarian. "arian" means having a concern or belief in a specified thing.

a cybrarain is one who has a concern for cyber things. not necessarily a librarian nor does a cybrarian need to be a librarian.

see http://web.archive.org/web/20050207194325/http://www.infotoday.com/MMSchools/jan99/nellen.htm for more and http://www.tnellen.com/ted/tc/cybrarian.html

Feb. 24 2010 12:50 PM
Suki from Williamsburg

You need two separate cards for Brooklyn and Manhattan libraries.

Feb. 24 2010 12:49 PM
Nick from NYC


I'm a librarian... your guest does us a bit of a disservice, in asserting that if you have a smart phone you don't need a library!

I'm always puzzled by the "apples to oranges" aspect of the oft-repeated claim that Google replaces the need for libraries... it is true that it can replace "ready reference"-type questions.... but, especially in the humanities... where can you get full-text books? Remember that most on Google books are from before 1923!

Plus - ever try sorting your search results on Google? What if your search term is a common word with multiple meanings? Suppose you want material *about* a subject, not just pages that mention the word somewhere on the page? I could go on and on....

But, main point: librarians have to keep making the point that Google in fact does not contain huge amounts of knowledge, despite popular assumptions!

Feb. 24 2010 12:47 PM
Matthew from Astoria

Did Marilyn just say that we have no cybercafes here like they have in Europe??

Here in Astoria, there are at least three cybercafes within a five-minute walk of my apartment. And it's nt just in my nabe ...

That said, she's right to remind us how important libraries are, and how skilled the librarians. Every time I go into a library, it's PACKED.

Feb. 24 2010 12:47 PM
JT

There is another great series for young adults which feature a mixed race protagonist. The Cronus Chronicles by Anne Ursu takes two characters through adventures when they discover that Greek myths are real. They are great, smart, and fun reads.

Feb. 24 2010 11:00 AM

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