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Fight or Flight

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Monday, February 08, 2010

Pulitzer Prize-winning military correspondent Thomas E. Ricks gives us an update on what's happening in Iraq. Then, saxophonist David Sanborn discusses his new album, “Only Everything.” The new Harrison Ford film “Extraordinary Measures” was inspired by a true story, and we’ll talk to John Crowley about his experience trying to save his two young children afflicted with a rare genetic disorder. And, the last six fatal plane crashes in the U.S. were on regional carriers--we’ll talk with the correspondent from the new Frontline documentary “Flying Cheap.”

Eye on Iraq

Thomas E. Ricks, senior fellow, Center for a New American Security, contributing editor for Foreign Policy magazine, special military correspondent for the Washington Post, and author of Fiasco and The Gamble, gives us an update on Iraq, looking at how stable the country is, what to expect from ...

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Only Everything

Saxophonist David Sanborn discusses his new CD, “Only Everything.” He’ll be performing at The Blue Note February 9 through February 14. More information and tickets here.

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Chasing Miracles

When John Crowley and his wife Aileen learned that their two youngest children had a rare genetic disorder called Pompe disease, he left his corporate job to help co-found a start-up biotech company focused exclusively on developing a treatment for the disease. His book Chasing Miracles: The Crowley Family ...

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Flying Cheap

Frontline correspondent Miles O’Brien talks about the crash of Continental Flight 3407 outside Buffalo last February. While it was identified as a Continental flight, it was actually operated by Colgan Air, a regional carrier. Miles O'Brien investigates major airlines' outsourcing to regional carriers to cut costs in the Frontline documentary ...

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