Streams

Revolutionary Ideas

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Monday, December 28, 2009

Find out why the impact of 30 years of growing income inequality could be greater than you think! Then, winemaker Michel Chapoutier talks about why he ignored everyone's advice and switched to using biodynamic techniques in his family's Rhone Valley vineyards. And, photographer Sue Kwon describes capturing the changes in New York over 20 years. Plus, Constance Rosenblum discusses the history of one of New York City's great boulevards -- the Grand Concourse in the Bronx!

It Could Happen Here

Many believe that America’s politics are too stable to allow a second revolution, but Bruce Judson, Yale School of Management senior faculty fellow, explains why he thinks the unprecedented 30-year rise of inequality here has made revolution is a real possibility. His book It Could Happen Here shows how ...

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Winemaker Michel Chapoutier

The name Chapoutier has been present in the Rhône Valley since 1808. Winemaker Michel Chapoutier discusses how he’s succeeded in bucking long-standing traditions with daring and creativity in winemaking by applying biodynamic growing techniques.

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Street Level

New York photographer Sue Kwon talks about her 20 years of taking documentary and commercial photographs in the city. Street Level: New York Photographs 1987-2007 is the first complete monograph to survey her work. It includes pictures of the Beastie Boys, Biggie Smalls, and the Wu-Tang Clan, as well as ...

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Boulevard of Dreams

Constance Rosenblum, the longtime editor of the New York Times’ City section, discusses the Grand Boulevard and Concourse, known simply as the Grand Concourse, a four-mile stretch of road through the center of the West Bronx. Her book Boulevard of Dreams: Heady Times, Heartbreak, and Hope Along the Grand ...

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