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From Disfunction to Distinction

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Thursday, December 03, 2009

William Eggers and John O'Leary suggests ways Americans can renew their trust in government. Then, comedian Howie Mandel discusses his lifelong battle with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Also, director Jenn Thompson and actress Mary Bacon talk about a new production of Sidney Howard’s 1931 play, "The Late Christopher Bean." Plus, our latest Underreported segments look at how the swine flu panic is being used to scare up votes in the Ukrainian election and why an inflammatory talk radio host informed for the FBI on the same white-supremacy groups he was catering to.

If We Can Put a Man on the Moon

William Eggers and John O'Leary discusses how we can renew our trust in our government and renew its legacy of competence. In If We Can Put a Man on the Moon: Getting Big Things Done in Government, they remind American people who might be frustrated with the government, the ...

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Don’t Touch Me

Comedian and host of "Deal or No Deal" Howie Mandel describes his ongoing struggle to overcome Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and ADHD, and how has it shaped his life and career. His book Here’s the Deal: Don’t Touch Me is a frank, funny account of his effort to find comic ...

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The Late Christopher Bean

Director Jenn Thompson and actress Mary Bacon discuss the "The Late Christopher Bean," a comedy rarely seen in New York since its Broadway premiere in 1932. It tells the story of a country doctor who learns that the paintings a poor former tenant gave him instead of rent are suddenly ...

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Underreported: Swine Flu and Ukraine's Presidential Election

Ukraine will hold its presidential election in January, but in recent weeks swine flu has threatened to delay the vote. On this week’s first Underreported: Julia Ioffe of Foreign Policy explains how fears about swine flu have been politicized and why next year’s election is so important to ...

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Underreported: The Prosecution of a Right Wing Radio Host Turned FBI Informant

For years Hal Turner hosted a right-wing internet radio show from northern New Jersey that catered to white supremacists and neo-Nazis. For most of that time Turner also received thousands of dollars from the FBI for acting as an informant who spied on the same groups he was broadcasting to. ...

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