Streams

Risk and the Road

« previous episode | next episode »

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

We’ll look into Wall Street’s love affair with risk, how that helped lead to the economic crisis, and what can be done to keep the same thing from happening again. Then, director Richard Linklater talks about his latest film, “Me and Orson Welles.” Also, Viggo Mortensen discusses the challenges of starring in the film adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s “The Road.” Plus, we look into why many young people are abandoning the small towns they grew up in for big cities, and how that’s effecting rural America.

The Looting of America

Les Leopold, director of the Labor Institute and the Public Health Institute, seeks to correct the myths that blame the financial meltdown on low-income home buyers who got in over their heads, people who ran up too much credit-card debt, and government interference with free markets. In The Looting ...

Comments [13]

Me and Orson Welles

Filmmaker Richard Linklater discusses his new movie "Me and Orson Welles." It’s based in real theatrical history, and is a romantic coming-of-age story about an actor who lands a role in "Julius Caesar," which is being re-imagined by a young, brilliant director named Orson Welles. "Me and Orson ...

Comments [2]

The Road

Actor Viggo Mortensen talks about his career and his role in the film "The Road," based on Cormac McCarthy’s novel about a father and son struggling for survival in a desperate, post-apocalyptic America. "The Road" opens nationwide Wednesday, November 25.

Comments [9]

Hollowing Out the Middle

Recent articles and books have celebrated the migration of highly productive and creative workers to key cities. Sociologists Patrick J. Carr describes what happens to the towns that they desert, and to the people who are left behind. In Hollowing Out the Middle: The Rural Brain Drain and What ...

Comments [4]

The Morning Brief

Enter your email address and we’ll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.