Streams

Underreported: Foreign Countries and Lobbying

Thursday, November 05, 2009

Countries such as Honduras and Sudan have come under fire recently for hiring PR and lobbying firms to make the case for them to American lawmakers. We’ll speak with Ken Silverstein, Washington Editor for Harper’s magazine about how foreign governments use lobbying firms in Washington D.C. to advance their agenda.

You can read Ken's article "Their Men in Washington" from 2007 here.

Guests:

Ken Silverstein
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Comments [6]

Denise from London

This article link below from the LA Times discusses why Zelaya was removed and quotes the elements from the Honduran constitution that show that Zelaya was acting illegally when trying to force a second term.
http://articles.latimes.com/2009/jul/10/opinion/oe-estrada10

Nov. 05 2009 02:01 PM
KC from NYC

Matthew & Denise: You need to do a little more research on Zelaya and the people who removed him from power. It was in no way a popular movement, and I'm not sure seeking a vote on lifting term limits constitutes an impeachable offense in any country on earth.

Nov. 05 2009 01:58 PM
Denise from London

I suspect that your guest has not himself read the Honduran constitution. We in the US, saw a dubious outcome in the election that gave Bush another term. Some people felt a non-objective court ignored the ballots of millions. Before his arrest, Zelaya was was taking aggressive and illegal steps to secure a second term. Many feared he would rig the vote to grant himself that right.

Nov. 05 2009 01:51 PM
Matthew from Astoria

Ken Silverstein just said that there were constitutional mechanisms for removing the president of Honduras. Actually, there weren't - the constitution of Honduras had no mechanism for impeaching a president that (as I've read from journalists on the scene) just about the entire nation wanted to impeach.

For what it's worth.

Nov. 05 2009 01:49 PM
BRUCE from midtowm,nyc

Hey Lenny,
After covering those most Influential Lobby groups of Sudan and Hondurus,check this out:

Steve Rosen Accuses AIPAC of Espionage
by Grant Smith, September 02, 2009

Steven J. Rosen’s defamation lawsuit against the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) is now entering a critical phase. A series of cross-filings stakes out the critical court terrain. Rosen intends to show that obtaining and leveraging classified U.S. government information in the service of Israel is common practice at AIPAC. He claims it was unfair for AIPAC to fire and malign him in the press after he was indicted on espionage charges in 2005.

Nov. 05 2009 12:53 PM
BRUCE from midtowm,nyc

Man Oh Man!
Honduras??? Sudan???Lobbying?

Guess the 900 lbs lobbying gorrila in the room was just OVERLOOKED...
AIPAC the Israel lobby group is forcing congressional legislation sanctions against Iran and trying to force US blockade against same,An Act of War folks!
AIPAC was strong supporter of the bankcrupt invasion of Iraq and is responsible for funnelling more than $10 million US taxpayer money per day to A Mighty belligereant Israel.
Not to mention the massive spying being conducted on US soil by Israeli operatives.
Stewart Nozzette,US sattelite/radar scientist,being latest traitor to pass highly classified info.to Israel.
Yeah,....Sudan.....Hondourus should be watched carefully!!!

Hey, Lenny Great show Bud!!!

According to the Christian Science Monitor,the cost of Israel to the American TAXpayer has been over $1.6 TRILLION since 1973.http://www.csmonitor.com/2002/1209/p16s01-wmgn.html

Nov. 05 2009 12:32 PM

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