Streams

Vermeer's The Milkmaid

Friday, September 18, 2009

Walter Liedtke, Curator in the Metropolitan Museum’s Department of European Paintings, discusses the exhibition "Vermeer’s Masterpiece The Milkmaid." For 400th anniversary of Henry Hudson’s historic voyage to Manhattan from Amsterdam, the Rijksmuseum has sent "The Milkmaid," one of the most admired painting by Johannes Vermeer, to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In celebration of this extraordinary loan, the museum has organized an exhibition of Vermeer paintings from its collection, along with a select group of works by other Dutch artists. The exhibition is on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, at 1000 Fifth Avenue, through November 29th.

Guests:

Walter Liedtke
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Comments [5]

dannyiselin from woodbridge, nj

Thanks for the answer. Years ago I wrote to the curator of the National Gallery in Washington who appeared on Charlie Rose's show about this same question and never got an answer.

Sep. 18 2009 01:23 PM
jill from new york

I was taught in art school that we are used to seeing light coming from the left hand side as when people painted before the advent of electricity, they typically positioned themselves to the left of a window so that their arm wouldn't cast a show onto the canvas. So, if Vermeer was standing parallel to the subject, both would have windows to the left.

Sep. 18 2009 01:21 PM
Brian from Inwood

It's interesting how enthralled Salvador Dalí was with Vermeer's work. I always thought it was from his childhood experiences—his admiration of the strong women in the house as well as his self-identification as a true Catholic.

Sep. 18 2009 01:16 PM
Sandra from Astoria, Queens

SO EXCITED to finally see this in person!!!

Sep. 18 2009 01:16 PM
dannyiselin from woodbridge, nj

How come in most every indoor Dutch painting has the window light coming in from the left????

Sep. 18 2009 01:10 PM

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