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Spending Ways and Waterways

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Tuesday, September 08, 2009

Americans personal savings rate has increased amidst the recession. Today we’ll get a cultural history of "thriftiness" in the United States. Then, author Sue Monk Kidd and her daughter Ann Monk Taylor on a new book they wrote together. Journalist Jessica Dulong talks about her experience working on a rusty antique fireboat on the Hudson River. And filmmaker Joe Berlinger and lawyer Steven Donziger on the new film "Crude," about indigenous people in Ecuador’s efforts to sue Chevron for what’s been called the "Amazon Chernobyl."

In Cheap We Trust

Lauren Weber explores the boundary between thrift and miserliness, and looks at whether thrift is a virtue or a vice during a recession. In her book In Cheap We Trust, she offers a colorful history of frugality in the United States and looks into the many meanings of "cheapness." ...

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Traveling with Pomegranates

Sue Monk Kidd, author of The Secret Life of Bees and The Mermaid Chair, and her daughter, Ann Kidd Taylor, discuss writing a dual memoir, Traveling with Pomegranates. The book offers the distinct perspectives of two women, mother and daughter, one in her 50s and one in ...

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My River Chronicles

Jessica DuLong explains why she abandoned her desk job at a dot com to become a fireboat engineer on a rusty antique fireboat, the John J. Harvey, in the Hudson River. In My River Chronicles: Rediscovering America on the Hudson she brings to life New York City's bygone ...

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Crude

Steven Donziger, a lawyer who represented indigenous Ecuadorian tribes in their lawsuit against the American oil company Chevron, and filmmaker Joe Berlinger discuss the documentary "Crude," about the lawsuit brought by the tribes, who alleged that their land, water and culture had been damaged by the policies of Texaco, which ...

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