Streams

But What do May, June, July and August Showers Bring?

Friday, August 14, 2009

Horticulturalist and Director of the Open Space Greening Program Gerard Lordahl answers your questions about gardening and talks about how this wet summer is affecting plants.

Guests:

Gerard Lordahl
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Comments [13]

Camillia from Irvington

The BEST snail deterrent I have found is crushed eggs shells. It's organic, natural and free!

Aug. 14 2009 01:38 PM
Voter from Brooklyn

Julie from JC,
Sounds like it could be a treehopper. They look like thorns on the stem and eat sap. Not sure what you can do about it, but if it is a treehopper, look for ways of controlling them.

Aug. 14 2009 12:42 PM
Becky from Montclair, NJ

Slug suggestions that I haven't heard, and which I've used:
1) Slug trap: Put half a grapefruit (after you've eaten!) upside down in the garden. Slugs climb under it for some reason and they stay there till morning.
2) Slug murder: This is really gross, but particularly fun if you have a kid who likes gross stuff. Go slug hunting at night with a flashlight and box of salt. Pour salt on the slugs and they will melt. Don't pour salt on the plants!

Aug. 14 2009 12:38 PM
Julie Daugherty from Jersey city

I have a small grey beetle with a horn down the center of its back that is eating my plants and maybe leaving black droppings. What can I do?
Also I wanted to grow blueberries in a pot but I got scared after reading that you need more than one plant to produce berries and that is was difficult to get the acid in the soil correct. Are blueberries difficult to grow in a pot?

Aug. 14 2009 12:35 PM
Lori from Montclair, NJ

Good conversation, thank you!

p.s. a slug slurry sounds like a high energy Jamba Juice offering

Aug. 14 2009 12:34 PM
Voter from Brooklyn

Gotta geek out for a moment and say that counter to what the guest said, diatomaceous earth is made of diatoms, not crushed seashells. It is mostly silica and not calcium like the shells so probably won’t change the colors of your hydrangeas.
DE is great for slugs in the garden and insects (roaches and ants) in the house… it’s like shards of glass in their little joints and it’s nontoxic… it used to be used in toothpaste.
Beer also works on slugs and snails.

Aug. 14 2009 12:33 PM
Amanda Waal from Brooklyn

Hello,

Could Mr. Lordahl recommend a site or book that might help an apartment dweller start a tiny container garden?

Thank you,
Amanda

Aug. 14 2009 12:32 PM
hjs from 11211

a dish of beer will kill slugs

Aug. 14 2009 12:30 PM
jerry from wstchstr

How to get rid of groundhogs and skunks?

please help!!!

Aug. 14 2009 12:29 PM
Yourgo from Astoria

I have some pots on my roof which gets direct full sun exposure all day long. The roof gets really hot. What can i plant that would withstand this heat and sun? (and maybe even survive the winter?)

Aug. 14 2009 12:27 PM
paul wolcott from NJ

Please ask Gerard to tell peoople NOT to compost infected tomato vines. The spores will stay in the composted soil. Infected vegetation should be bagged and thrown away.
Thanks.

Aug. 14 2009 12:25 PM
Cathy from Park Slope

Help! I have planted summer squash and tomatoes in pots on my deck -- squirrels ate all the squash blossoms and now they are eating the green tomatoes. What can I do? My plants are in pots -- I can't build some giant structure around them to protect them. Do you have any advice?

Aug. 14 2009 12:24 PM
Yourgo from Astoria

I have some pots on my roof which have full sun exposure all day long. And with the silver paint it makes the roof very hot. What can i plant up there that would be tolerant of the extreme sun and heat.? (and maybe even survive the winter?)

Aug. 14 2009 12:24 PM

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