Streams

New York City Thrillers

Monday, August 10, 2009

Reggie Nadelson, author of Londongrad; Lee Child, author of Gone Tomorrow; and George Dawes Green, author of Ravens talk to us about writing crime thrillers set in New York City. From picking a setting to characters and story development.

Guests:

Lee Child, George Dawes Green and Reggie Nadelson

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Comments [12]

Virginia from Brooklyn, NY

I wanted to write in to let you know I immediately ordered Londongrad on Amazon after listening to your radio show. Your topic was wonderful and I thought it was so interesting that none of the authors thought they had to be cops by day and writers by night to write their novels -- their imaginations were their key point of reference. Reggie Nadelson had a fantastic radio show voice and she was fun to listen to. I really got pulled into your show. Thank you so much for airing it.

Aug. 12 2009 11:10 AM
Hesch Rothman from Knickerbocker, NY [Lower East Side]

RE: the NYC subway system

The "Subway and Bus Ridership Statistics 2008" page [http://www.mta.info/nyct/facts/ridership/index.htm] states: "The New York City subway system has 468 stations – the largest number of public transit subway stations of any system in the world."

One of the factoids published on the back of the recent series of MetroCards stated that the 468 stations are >>>>>> see below

About one in every three users of mass transit in the United States and two-thirds of the nation's rail riders live in New York and its suburbs.[Wikipedia: Transportation in New York City]

OK - I am trying to track down public mass transit data, but have failed on the particular factoid that started this; so I am going to fill in my best guess / memory:

<<<<<< 13 fewer than the TOTAL # of stations of the next 3 largest subway systems. And THAT will change with the projected 2nd Av line opening.

More factoids found while searching, and outstanding enough to bother you with:

According to the American Society of Civil Engineers' Report Card for America's Infrastructure, which gives a Grade of D for 2009, reports [http://www.infrastructurereportcard.org/fact-sheet/transit]: in 2004, 23% of public transit funding came from passenger fares; in 2007, nationwide, the "Traffic Delay Reduction Due to Public Transportation" was 541M hours and saved $10,154M by providing 51,426M Passenger-Miles of Travel.

Aug. 11 2009 06:16 PM
Steven Zwerling from New York City

Very good segment. I was especially happy to hear Reggie Nadelson. Her Artie Cohen series is terrific. A new book appears about once a year and I can't wait to get my hands on them. I've ordered "Londongrad" and can't wait to get my hands on it. Thanks for having her on. Do it again some time.

Aug. 11 2009 05:20 AM
sally roy from nyc

Huge Artie Cohen Fan!!! Great segment--love books set in NYC.

Aug. 10 2009 10:16 PM
Hillel from White Plains NY

I have read several of the Artie Cohen books by Reggie Nadelson and have enjoyed every one of them. The books were part of what inspired me to drag several friends to a Russian nightclub in Brooklyn a few years ago and I thank her for it. She sounded very witty on your program and I immediately ordered a copy of her new book, Londongrad.

Aug. 10 2009 10:05 PM
Hesch Rothman from Knickerbocker, NY [Lower East Side]

Pertinent to ANY discussion with writers (or readers):

Of course Truth is stranger than Fiction;
Fiction has to make sense.

Sorry, I have not tracked down an attribution for this "truism" taken from one of the many buttons in my collection.

Peace - Hesch

Aug. 10 2009 02:08 PM
Amy from Manhattan

So Mafia wannabes aspire to The Godfather & gangsta wannabes aspire to Scarface?

Aug. 10 2009 01:53 PM
ther from Brooklyn

Of the three mentioned earlier HRF Keating never lived in Bombay but wrote with such realism about people places and the crimes ......
This was before google was even available

Made an error - It is "arthur upfield" ...
and "Van Gulik"

Aug. 10 2009 01:49 PM
Joel Hoffman from Westchester

I have a friend from Israel who likes to say that what Tel Aviv is to Israel, New York is to the world....

-Joel Hoffman
(an enormous fan of Lee Child's)

Aug. 10 2009 01:36 PM
David Dawson from Brooklyn

Your readers are very romantic. I have lived in Brooklyn for years and have found it to change right along with Manhattan. It is not what it was and is very gentrified.
Also I find the New York subway to still be over-crowded, disgusting and very out of date; everyone is in a bad mood I don't see the beauty there at all. Thanks.

Aug. 10 2009 01:33 PM
ther from Brooklyn

I would add Van Glik who set his mysteries in 16th century China and call"the judge Dee mystries
HRF keating who set his in India call thee Inspeector ghote --
and Finally Arthur Ufield who set his Australia The Napoleon Bonarte (Boni) mysteries a haklf aborigine detective

Aug. 10 2009 01:29 PM
RC

How much of what you write is based on first hand experience. In particular, where the characters are located, their habits, what they eat etc..

Aug. 10 2009 12:42 PM

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