Streams

Food in the City: At the Farmer's Market with Peter Hoffman

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Peter Hoffman, chef of Savoy and Back Forty, joins us for Part II of our Food in the City series. He’ll be explaining how to create meals from what you buy at the farmer’s market and how to talk to farmers and choose the best produce.

We want your "New York" recipes! Share your recipes – from your New York. They can be recipes you brought with you from somewhere else and adapted to your new home here in the city or just personal touches you’ve added to classic recipes over the years. Submit your recipe here.

Peter Hoffman's Recipe for Garlic Scape and Beet Salad with Pecorino Cheese

1 bunch beets with nice tops
8-10 garlic scapes
Extra virgin olive oil
Lemon juice
White wine vinegar
2 sprigs black mint
1/4 # aged sheep cheese shaved

Separate the beets from their tops. Wash everything, discarding leaves in poor condition. Roast the beets in a covered pan for 40 minutes at 400 degrees, depending on size. Check for doneness by passing a knife through the beet. Cool and peel. Cut the beet leaves into bite-size pieces.

Slice the garlic scapes into 2"-long pieces, treating them as if they were string beans. Saute the scapes in a wide open pan in extra virgin olive oil. As they pick up color and cook, salt and pepper them. Taste for doneness. Add the beet leaves and begin to wilt them but not completely. The leaves still want to have life and rawness to them but have the edge of raw taken from them. Pour the scapes, leaves, and any remaining oil into the bowl that the salad will be composed in. Add the sliced beets and toss. Toss in the mint that has been roughly chopped just before adding it to the salad. Sprinkle lightly with a bit of lemon juice and the vinegar. Taste for brightness and balance. Add the thinly sliced cheese and toss again. Plate the salad and eat.

Guests:

Peter Hoffman,
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Comments [8]

pc from nyc

can you ask where he buys his livestock?

Jun. 16 2009 12:42 PM
pc from nyc

BackForty -- Best hamburger ever!

Jun. 16 2009 12:41 PM
Amy from Manhattan

NYC is trying to maintain water quality "but" protect upstate farms? Aren't they the same goal, because it's the huge Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (not the small, independent farms) that have the huge amounts of waste runoff going into our drinking water?

(And Leonard, I laughed at your scape-goat pun!)

Jun. 16 2009 12:39 PM
Chris

Please ask Mr. Hoffman why non meat food seems to be so much less popular both in nyc restaurants and generally in nyc culture.

Jun. 16 2009 12:38 PM
beb from out of your league, but my nose is in the air


Is Peter the most expensive restaurant on the east side

of Lafayette St.?

Why is he so despised in NOLITA?

Jun. 16 2009 12:35 PM
Fish from brooklyn

(highest pesticide load)

1 (worst) Peach 100
2 Apple 93
3 Sweet Bell Pepper 83
4 Celery 82
5 Nectarine 81
6 Strawberries 80
7 Cherries 73
8 Kale 69
9 Lettuce 67
10 Grapes - Imported 66
11 Carrot 63
12 Pear 63
13 Collard Greens 60
14 Spinach 58
15 Potato 56
16 Green Beans 53
17 Summer Squash 53
18 Pepper 51
19 Cucumber 50
20 Raspberries 46
21 Grapes - Domestic 44
22 Plum 44
23 Orange 44
24 Cauliflower 39
25 Tangerine 37
26 Mushrooms 36
27 Banana 34
28 Winter Squash 34
29 Cantaloupe 33
30 Cranberries 33
31 Honeydew Melon 30
32 Grapefruit 29
33 Sweet Potato 29
34 Tomato 29
35 Broccoli 28
36 Watermelon 26
37 Papaya 20
38 Eggplant 20
39 Cabbage 17
40 Kiwi 13
41 Sweet Peas - Frozen 10
42 Asparagus 10
43 Mango 9
44 Pineapple 7
45 Sweet Corn - Frozen 2
46 Avocado 1
47 (best) Onion 1 (lowest pesticide load)

Jun. 16 2009 12:26 PM
Lily from Phoenix

I wanted to bring seeds back from China, but there were restrictions from doing that. Are there not the same restrictions from bringing seeds back from Europe to the U.S.?

Jun. 16 2009 12:13 PM
kai from NJ-NYC

What does Mr. Hoffman think of the "local water" (i.e., water from the tap, filtered or not) component of local food? While it is a bigger deal in places like San Francisco, a local water movement is burgeoning in NYC because our water supply, from the Catskill-NYC watershed, is some of the best in the world.

Jun. 16 2009 12:07 PM

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