Streams

The State of Afghanistan

Thursday, May 21, 2009

Rory Stewart walked across Afghanistan in 2002, and he served as a deputy governor of two provinces in southern Iraq in 2004. Last year he was appointed Ryan Professor of Human Rights at Harvard University and Director of the Harvard Kennedy School's Carr Center for Human Right Policy. He discusses his work in Afghanistan--he is CEO of the Turquoise Mountain Foundation, a charitable organization in Kabul--as well as the current state of the country.

He was on the Leonard Lopate Show in August 2006 to discuss his book The Prince of the Marshes. You can listen to that interview here.

Guests:

Rory Stewart

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Comments [4]

Vic from NJ

Very interesting your interview with Rory Stewart. I look forward to reading his book. Unfortunately, the poor Afghani are between a rock and a hard place.

May. 21 2009 03:05 PM
kai from NJ-NYC

Well said, Karen.

To think that so many people automatically write off knowledge that can be gained because it is foreign to them and their ways of life and, thus, it seems worthless. There might be fear that greater and wider knowledge can lead to a challenge of their assumptions which can lead others around them to change the status quo. The thing is that understanding for Americans is as just as difficult as it is for all humanity.

May. 21 2009 01:59 PM
Amy from Manhattan

I wouldn't equate praying 5 times a day & fasting during Ramadan w/being a "fundamentalist" Muslim. I know Muslims who do both & are far from anything that could be described that way, including a very open-minded woman I've worked with in a fairly high-ranking office job.

May. 21 2009 01:51 PM
Karen from Westchester

Knowledge so vital to U.S. foreign policy but no one is listening? Is there anything really as important as this right now for Washington and the American people to understand? I think not.

May. 21 2009 01:43 PM

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