Streams

Poisoned Waters

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

30 years after the Clean Water Act, large amounts of industrial and agricultural pollutants are winding up America’s waterways. PBS Frontline correspondent Hedrick Smith looks at the perilous environmental condition of the US's most productive coastal estuaries--Chesapeake Bay and Puget Sound--in the new documentary "Poisoned Waters." It airs on PBS affiliate stations tonight, April 21st.

Guests:

Hedrick Smith
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Comments [11]

anonyme from new york, NY

this extends to what kind of chicken you buy - support your local farmers! Buy their grass fed chickens who eat no hormones or pellets of fake food or soy - check out the weston price foundation for help

Apr. 21 2009 03:19 PM
anonyme from new york, NY

[10] hajoljack

google cosmetics database - i fear for the genitalia of the next generation.

Apr. 21 2009 03:13 PM
hajoijack

So WHICH soap/detergents/shampoo/cleaners/toothpaste/deodorants are better? A list?

PS -- HS you da MAN!

Apr. 21 2009 12:40 PM
Cedra from NYC

will female birth control pills be banned if found to harm wildlife?

Apr. 21 2009 12:37 PM
kai from NJ-NYC

Jeb, you're right that greed and thoughtlessness is part of the human condition regardless of political persuasion.

The thing is that property rights are respected in the U.S., but how do you propose private ownership of rivers, lakes, watersheds, bays, seas, and oceans. There is a reason why no one owns these waterways because it is impossible; they are too large and unmanageable with little to no incentive for any company, business, etc.

The reason why governments (and thus its citizens) hold the rights to huge amounts of natural resources, land, waterways, is because no other entity can come close to managing them. In a democracy, it is up to and informed and active citizenship to hold their government accountable on such matters as ending pollution.

Apr. 21 2009 12:31 PM
db from nyc

... what can we do? is there any good news? have there been any positive inroads?

Apr. 21 2009 12:31 PM
Walter from NY

Re.- "(Jeb): If you allowed private ownership of all resources including rivers, and territorial waters, we...": Is that you, Jeb BUSH???

Apr. 21 2009 12:30 PM
Pam, MD from NY

Is it true that in the last 100 yrs., 90% of the biomass has disappeared from our oceans?

Re.- "If you allowed private ownership of all resources including rivers, and territorial waters, we would would have a clean environment": WHAT A BUNCH OF HOOEY! Private concerns are responsible for all pollution; gov't. makes them clean it up (on occasion){.

Apr. 21 2009 12:26 PM
bernardo from brooklyn, ny

Are the environmentalists doing enough? It would seem not. We keep hearing about win-win solutions from them, but this segment seems to highlight the continued failure to substantively address environmental degradation in the U.S.

Apr. 21 2009 12:25 PM
Caitlin from Sunset Park

Jeb, the Chesapeake is largely next to South-East Virginia, which I can assure you is very, very red (and rural), as is the Maryland part of the Delmarva peninsula. The communities of fishermen in this area have been pretty thoroughly decimated thanks to overfishing and pollution, plus skyrocketing property values thanks to folks from the DC area who want a weekend house on the water.

Apr. 21 2009 12:24 PM
Gabrielle from brooklyn

Is it that large corporations with their campaign contributions are given a free pass when it comes to polluting? If so, how can the common person hold these companies accountable when the government won't?

Apr. 21 2009 06:35 AM

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