Streams

Five Spice Street

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Chinese author Can Xue novel Five Spice Street is a surrealistic story about the residents on an unnamed street and their speculations about a mysterious "Madam X."

Event: Can Xue will be reading
Thursday, April 16, at 4:00 pm
Whitney Humanities Center
Yale University
New Haven, Connecticut

Guests:

Can Xue
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Comments [5]

Alan from Manhattan

Sorry for the error! I should have written: "Attempts to pronounce Romanized Chinese as though it were English will lead invariably to mispronunciation."

Apr. 14 2009 01:19 PM
Phyllisf from NYC

Alan, thanks. About time, Leonard, that you did this. We have endured your cringe-inducing pronunciations for years.

Apr. 14 2009 01:19 PM
Alan from Manhattan

Leonard, the pronunciation of Can Xue's name is Tsahn Hsueh.

Although there exist several different systems of Chinese Romanization, Hanyu Pinyin is the system officially in use in China today. Applying the rules of that system, it is possible to know the correct pronunciation of her name, although the system conveys no indication of the proper tones.

If one attempts to pronounce Romanized Chinese as though it were English will lead invariably to mispronunciation.

I think that all radio and TV speakers should bone up on Mandarin Chinese pronunciation, which can be done by spending an hour or so learning the Hanyu Pinyin system. Here are a few links that may help:

http://www.chineselearner.com/pinyin/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinyin
http://www.pinyin.info/romanization/hanyu/chinese_alphabet.html

Apr. 14 2009 01:17 PM
mym from flatbush

Agreee with phyllis! tiny bit painful to hear in the beginning.. but it's flowing now.. thanks producer/leonard!

Apr. 14 2009 12:54 PM
Phyllisf from NYC

Have mercy on us all, let her answer in Chinese and have the translator translate!!

Apr. 14 2009 12:47 PM

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