Streams

Dodging Baseball's Good Graces

Friday, March 20, 2009

Although Walter O'Malley has been dead for nearly 30 years his, the former Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers owner is still one of the most controversial persons ever associated with the sport. Michael D’Antonio's exhaustive biography of O’Malley is called Forever Blue.

Event: Michael D'Antonio will be in conversation with Walter O'Malley's son Peter, moderated by Richard Sandomir of the New York Times
Saturday, March 21, at 1:00 pm
Brooklyn Historical Society
128 Pierrepont Street, Brooklyn

Guests:

Michael D’Antonio's
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Comments [6]

Eric Tremont from Berkeley CA

Henry D. Fetter has written the definitive history of the Brooklyn Dodgers move to Los Angeles.

Mar. 20 2009 05:12 PM
NABNYC from Southern California

My mother was the child of Irish immigrants, raised in Manhattan, and a Brooklyn Dodgers' fan. She was also a skinny and pretty girl and later woman, and of course back then women did not "follow" sports or certainly play any of them, so she was a fairly dainty, delicate, and lady-like person.

Until Opening Day, that is. Because once baseball season began, my mother abandoned her floral-print blouses and skirts and replaced them with casual tops and pants that would match her Dodgers Hat. Which she even wore inside the house.

Once of my constant childhood memories is of my mother with her Dodger hat on, listening to a game on the radio, and ironing. It was such a contradiction in some ways, but the Dodgers were simply burned into her DNA and heart. The Brooklyn Bums. They may have been bums, but they were her bums.

Mar. 20 2009 01:00 PM
Paul from New York

Ry Cooder's excellent concept album "Chavez Ravine" is a multi-layered narrative about the neighborhood wiped out by Dodger Stadium -- highly recommended. Certainly a critical point of view, but also, as one expects from Cooder, a very moving and fun musical education with lots of cameos and collaborators. Cooder notes that people from the neighborhood learned to tell where they had lived by referring to the stadium's overlaid structure -- "I'm from third base," etc.

Mar. 20 2009 12:59 PM
JOHN from PARAMUS, NJ

BUT THEY COULD NEVER BEAT THE YANKEES!!!

Mar. 20 2009 12:38 PM
JOHN from PARAMUS, NJ

ISN"T TRUE THAT ITS REALLY ROBERT MOSES FAULT
THAT THE DODGERS MOVED
JOHN

Mar. 20 2009 12:33 PM
Bobby G from East Village

My Father, who was born in LA in the 1920's, hated O'Malley because the City of LA gave away for nothing some of the most valuable land near downtown to the Dodgers for their stadium.

Mar. 20 2009 11:29 AM

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