Streams

Playing Your Brain

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Dr. Stewart Brown has spent his career studying animal behavior and has also conducted more than six thousand "play histories" of humans from all walks of life. His findings indicate that play is essential to developing our social skills, adaptability, intelligence, creativity and more. His book is Play: How It Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination and Invigorates the Soul.

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Dr. Stewart Brown
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Comments [6]

gaetano catelli from manhattan

no one has the slightest idea why Charles Whitman did what he did. it is amusing that those who feel superior to believers in traditional religious mythologies are oftenso gullible regarding the contemporary religious mythology known as "psychology".

Mar. 21 2009 08:13 PM
JP from Hackensack

Tom from DC,

Car only suburbs? You talk as if this is a new phenomenon. I grew up in a car only suburb and I’m forty years old. That’s the biggest load of crap I have heard in a long time. There were plenty of other kids to interact with in the hood. I would blame schools that have cut out gym class and made games I grew up on like hide and go seek illegal to play on school grounds. What’s wrong with learning how to win and lose?

I think you are right in that it’s how the kids are raised. Yes I had an Atari 2600 and I was latch key kid. But I wasn’t allowed to play video games 24/7. And I was so conditioned to being kicked out of the house to go play outside when it was nice weather that even when my mom was still at work, I was outside playing with my buddies when we could have all been inside and bug eyed playing endless hours of video games.

Suburbs have many problems and some very serious but please don’t say stupid things like it causes kids to text message more. Do you really think city kids with cell phones text message less and dont enjoy it as much as car only suburb kids? Just absurd…..

We can’t all grow up in nice regentrificated sections of urban cities. My mom chose to stay in the car only suburb because it had a excellent school system, was extremely safe town to live in and most importation of all it was the only nice town we could afford to live in.

Mar. 10 2009 02:06 PM
Susan Rubenstein from Brooklyn

The personality of a Pit Bull is a direct result of how it is treated. My Pit bull is loved and played with and would not hurt a fly. In England They are called the nanny dog because they are so loyal looking after the family. I grew up afraid of dogs and I love all dogs now because of the beautiful spirit of my Pit Bull. Your guest doesn't know much about dogs.

Mar. 10 2009 01:37 PM
Jane from brooklyn, ny

you knew you were going to get mail about that pit bull remark, didn't you? from us crazy pit bull lovers. the majority of dog bites in the emergency room are from labs and goldens. pit bulls don't even make the top 5 list.

Mar. 10 2009 01:31 PM
Tom from DC

I've heard this idea that kids' texting and FB as a growing concern because children aren't playing and having face-to-face time. However, if you see how kids are being raised today in car-only suburbs, they don't have a chance at playing and face-to-face time. Kids can't physically visit their friends anymore; they're not allowed outside to play. So in the space of that lack of social life, they do the next best thing, text and get on FB. Maybe if parents weren't afraid of the boogey man and created walkable communities, they wouldn't be texting and FB'ing all the time.

Mar. 10 2009 01:18 PM
hjs from 11211


any thoughts about the chimp who planned ahead to throw rocks at zoo visitors?
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/03/10/2512179.htm?site=science&topic=latest

Mar. 10 2009 12:52 PM

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