Streams

The Knowing Nose

Monday, February 16, 2009

Smell is one of the least understood senses, but it can have a tremendous influence on our behaviors. In his book What the Nose Knows olfaction expert Avery Gilbert gives us the latest scientific discoveries on how we perceive what’s wafting in the air.

Guests:

Avery Gilbert
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Comments [7]

Suzanne from Westchester

Avery Gilbert will answer all your questions next Monday,(Feb 23), 7 pm at Purchase College. Call 914-251-6200.

Feb. 16 2009 05:26 PM
Mel from manhattan

Do women have a more sensitive sense of smell than men?

Feb. 16 2009 12:58 PM
Mike from UES

more trivia
I have noticed that countries have smells. When ever I visit Japan or receive a package from their I notice the distinct smell that greets me whenever I arrive in Narita Airport

Feb. 16 2009 12:57 PM
margaret from nj

speaking of smell gaps, why is it so many people cannot tell when orange juice is turned? I have only a few friends that can smell/taste that yucky old oj odor, and we just can't drink it, while our other friends don't know what we're talking about.

Feb. 16 2009 12:55 PM
rick from manhattan

Leonard,

Will you go back to ask a question about cooking smells?
Does the smell of food cooking actually make you feel full or satisfied?

I often don't feel hungry after a long session of cooking. I believe I remember my mother having the same experience when I was a kid.

Feb. 16 2009 12:53 PM
Julian from Manhattan

Excuse me, but a bloodhound has 4 billion olfactory receptor cells, translating to 59 sq. inches of surface area, vs. 12 million in humans, which represents 1.5 sq. inches. Dogs have a far greater ability to sense smell, otherwise, for example, why would not humans serve as tracking "dogs."

Feb. 16 2009 12:48 PM
Mike from UES

if a dog's sense of smell is sooooo sensitive... why the heck do they have to sick their nose RIGHT up INTO everything they are sniffing?
What the heck?
oh by the way ....
I have read that the nose and sexual organs have some developmental parallels during embryonic development.

Feb. 16 2009 12:46 PM

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