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Thursday, January 22, 2009

Hear the history of how time is measured - from primitive astronomy to modern precision clocks. Also, on Underreported: find out why the problem of huge plastic garbage patches in our oceans could be one of the most pressing environmental problems we’re facing today.

Join us for a Leonard Lopate Show film screening! On Tues., Feb. 3, we'll watch Frank Capra's "American Madness." Find out more and RSVP.

In Search of Time

Hear about the history of time measurement – from primitive astronomy to modern precision clocks. Dan Falk is author of In Search of Time: The Science of a Curious Dimension.

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The Rise of William Randolph Hearst

Find out how William Randolph Hearst became a controversial newspaper magnate and in the process helped shape American journalism. Kenneth Whyte’s new book is The Uncrowned King: The Sensational Rise of William Randolph Hearst.

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Diedrich Knickerbocker’s History of New York

Elizabeth L. Bradley of the New York Public Library talks about how Washington Irving created a New York City legend in 1809 when he published a chronicle of New York’s 50 years under Dutch rule from the perspective of his fictional character Diedrich Knickerbocker.

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Elizabeth L. Bradley ...

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Cheater Ants

In ant society, workers give up reproducing in order to care for the queen’s offspring. When the workers cheat and try to have their own kids, their fellow workers attack them in order to stop them from reproducing. Dr. Juergen Liebig of Arizona State University, author of a new study ...

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Underreported: Ocean Garbage Patch

In the Central North Pacific, plastic outweighs surface zooplankton 6 to 1. Find out why the problem of garbage and plastic floating around in our oceans could be one of the most pressing environmental disasters we face now. Dr. Marcus Eriksen of the Algalita Marine Research Foundation sailed ...

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