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Beyond the Prison

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Tuesday, January 06, 2009

Guantanamo is more than a prison and a naval base. Find out about the town of Guantanamo, the people who live there, and what its history reveals about U.S.-Cuban relations. Also: a look at whether nuclear fusion will ever be a viable energy source. Get tips for cooking in small NY apartment kitchens. Plus, hear one woman's account of her year as a patient in a mental institution.

A Year in the Mental Institution

Norah Vincent talks about voluntarily committing herself to a mental institution, and year she then spent as a patient there. Her new memoir is Voluntary Madness.

Event:
Norah Vincent will be speaking and signing books
Tues. Jan. 6 at 7 PM
Barnes and ...

Comments [9]

Sun in a Bottle

Fifty years ago, scientists predicted that fusion would provide the world with an endless supply of energy. That hasn’t turned out to be true. Charles Seife, author of Sun in a Bottle, talks about whether or not nuclear fusion will ever be a viable energy source.

Comments [6]

Urban Italian Cooking

Chef Andrew Carmellini gives tips on cooking in small urban apartment kitchens. His new cookbook is Urban Italian.

Weigh in: If you're an avid cook, how do you cope with the limitations of small NYC kitchens?

Comments [8]

Guantanamo at a Crossroads

Guantanamo is more than a prison and a naval base. Find out about the town of Guantanamo, the people who live there, and what its history reveals about U.S.-Cuban relations. Jana Lipman is the author of Guantanamo.

Comments [2]

Chef Andrew Carmellini’s recommendations for Italian shops in NYC

 

 

Biancardi Meats
(For baby lamb, goat liver sausage and veal) 2350 Arthur Ave.,
Bronx, NY 10458
718-733-4058

 

 

Borgatti’s Ravioli and Egg Noodles
(For ravioli and fresh pasta)
632 E. 187th Street
Bronx, NY 10458
(718) ...

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