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Want to Be a Top Chef?

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Tuesday, December 16, 2008

New York, California, and many of the states in between are facing major budget crises. We find out how the resulting cutbacks could affect all of our lives. Also: chef Tom Colicchio on whether TV shows like "Top Chef" have made people more - or less – likely to pursue culinary careers!

Guests:

Tom Colicchio

State Budgets under the Obama Administration

WNYC senior reporter Bob Hennelly covered the National Governors Association meeting earlier this month. He explains why the meeting was so unusual and what President-elect Barack Obama said to the group during this rough economic time. He also fills us in on the fiscal problems facing New York ...

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State Budgets in Crisis

Elizabeth McNichol is a Senior Fellow with the State Fiscal Project of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. She explains why budget deficits are such a problem for state governments, and what role our nationwide recession is playing. Plus: a look at how states are addressing their shortfalls.

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Director Paul Schrader

Director Paul Schrader didn’t see any films before he was 18 years old thanks to a strict Calvinist education. His 1985 film “Mishima” is a portrait of the flamboyant writer, actor, and bodybuilder Yukio Mishima; it’s at the Film Forum Dec. 17-23 (209 W. Houston). His ...

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"Top Chef" and Culinary Careers

Have TV shows like "Top Chef" made viewers more – or less – likely to choose careers in the culinary industry? Leonard talks to chef Tom Colicchio and the French Culinary Institute’s founder Dorothy Hamilton.

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Happy 45th Birthday to the NYRB

The New York Review of Books began in 1963, during the New York publishing strike. Since then, it's become a leading voice in the debate over American life, culture, and politics. Robert Silvers joins us to celebrate NYRB’s 45th anniversary.

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