Streams

TV on the Web

Monday, November 24, 2008

We discuss the future of television, now that many popular TV shows are increasingly watched on the internet. Leonard talks to John Gottfried of Devour.tv; Geoffrey Drummond, who produces cooking programs for TV; and Fred Seibert of Next New Networks and Frederator Studios.

Weigh in: Do you prefer to watch shows on the TV or on the internet? What do you like and dislike about each medium?

Guests:

Geoffrey Drummond, John Gottfried and Fred Seibert

Comments [8]

Michael Antonoff from New York, NY

The point of high-def is a big TV screen. A hand-held display simply doesn't contain enough pixels to exploit all the information, and most of it is discarded.

Nov. 24 2008 02:04 PM
JML from Brooklyn

For the most part, I'm not fond of sitting and watching television, so it's really nice to be able to watch key events (like the Obama interview on 60 minutes) at will. When a series is particularly good, I'd rather see it on a screen that's bigger than my computer screen, so I'll Netflix it. I'm really excited by people who are creating short works that address unusual topics and characters (like, for example, Helium and Strindberg)that aren't driven by sponsors or marketing analysis, and are just about someone's sense of humor or idiosyncratic world view.

Nov. 24 2008 01:54 PM
jill from new york

I've started watching the Office and 30 Rock on hulu.com- the video quality is great, it's available anytime anywhere, and the total ad time is about 3 minutes. Much better than broadcast TV!

Nov. 24 2008 01:36 PM
Ernest from East Orange

I moved into this apartment last year. I wanted to get the TV,internet and phone deal; but found that the fiberoptic lines where unavailable. So I signed for the land line and DSL. After a month I got rid of the phone and signed up for Netflix, youtube and Hulu. I don't want TV. I have a Cell phone, DSL and old fashioned radio. Thats all I need.

Nov. 24 2008 01:35 PM
hjs from 11211

with my work/play schedule i never watch tv when the shows first air.
where i used to video tape now i try to watch off the net. but i hate the ads on the net broadcasts same commercial over and over.

Nov. 24 2008 12:51 PM
Ray Normandeau from www.Queensbridge.us

We watch very little OTA [over the air] TV.

Most TV shows we watch is over the internet.
We get our news from
Stephan Colbert
and
Keith Olberman
and
Rachel Maddow
and
Democracy Now

Regular TV news is too jarring with all their video and sound effects. Do they want to be news or simulate a video game?

We did get DTV converter box and with it can get free 21 channels at Queensbridge Houses at the Queensboro Bridge. We discontinued Time-Warner AOL, months ago. In a bill insert they said you have to worry about RF leakage from their cable if you don't use their box. What a crock!

Nov. 24 2008 09:42 AM
Nathaniel Seeley from Staten Island

I recently hooked myself up with a digital TV and antena and was suprised to discover that my reception improved 1000% and that HD was available over broadcast. Please let the public know that this an option. I'm upset that cable and verizon FIOS are able to use misinformation and scare tactics to get people to sign up for pay TV when it is available for free. Furthetmore if the public were aware of this and went this route wouldn't it help to increase the offering on broadcast? Thanks, Nathaniel Seeley

Nov. 24 2008 09:18 AM
Nogee from West Babylon NY


TV on the Web
Most videoclips their websites appears to be of "poor quality", especially videoclips on "You Tube" website; and its' not just because they are home-made videoclips posted on You Tube website.

For instance, some videoclips of show previews on Comedy Central Channel Website, are only good quality on the "small size," If you "enlarge the screen" the videoclips becomes "blurry."

There's a lot more work (technical work) to assimilate "TV Options" with "Computer Monitor Options."

Nogee

Nov. 24 2008 12:19 AM

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