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Best Political Writing of 2008

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

2008 has been a remarkably rich year for political reporters. Leonard talks to Jane Mayer of the New Yorker, John Heilemann of New York Magazine, and Todd Purdum of Vanity Fair. All are included in the new collection Best American Political Writing 2008.

Guests:

John Heilemann, Jane Mayer and Todd Purdum
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Comments [6]

AWM from UWS

Run, Baby, Run!

Palin 2012!

Nov. 18 2008 12:47 PM
licnyc

I have heard 54% of republicans want sarah palin to run in 2012- and 100% of democrats

Nov. 18 2008 12:40 PM
AWM from UWS

I spoke too soon.

Nov. 18 2008 12:36 PM
AWM from UWS

Hmmm, I've heard no mention of Sarah Palin yet...

EXCELLENT!

Nov. 18 2008 12:35 PM
Nick from Manhattan


I commend the work of your guests, and I hope that they stay on the case - this Administration is not over until we get answers to all of those questions that were stonewalled by Bush and his cronies.

I'd like to see a re-visiting of the Taguba Report - where, for instance, are the myriad photographs and videos mentioned there? Who has them? What happened to the people shown in them?

What happened to the White House emails which "disppeared"? I'm sure that they are heaping documents on the shredders and bonfires all day long. It's up to our journalists to get to the bottom of this on behalf of all of the citizens of the U.S.

Thank you!

Nov. 18 2008 12:25 PM
Gene

Dole = McCain??

Lightyears apart, imho. In 1996, Dole was an unconsciounable hack. While McCain did kowtow to the religious base, he never would have gone so far as to tout his tobacco funders' line like this:

"We know it's [tobacco] not good for kids, but a lot of things aren't good. Some would say milk's not good."

Nov. 18 2008 12:19 PM

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