Streams

Oliver Stone’s “W”

Thursday, October 09, 2008

Oliver Stone, one of the most openly political directors in the movie business, talks about his latest film, “W.” It’s a biopic of President George W. Bush.

Guests:

Oliver Stone
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Comments [3]

Prof. Dave

It's not only Bush's "willful neglect" as described in an earlier comment: it's negligent supervision of Congress and the Senate, and a complicit Justice Department. Bush has had their tacit approve to do. . . whatever he wanted to.

Presidents should no longer have any say in who runs the Justice Department or the Supreme Court!

Oct. 19 2008 12:25 PM
JOHN from PARAMUS, NJ

OLIVER STONE MAKES FILMS THAT MAKE US THINK
WHICH I THINK IS THE MARK OF A GREAT DIRECTOE

Oct. 09 2008 12:41 PM
Troy from westchester

Who would have thought one President could have 1) idle as long as the economy collapsed, 2) foolhardily diminished the military and its resources, 3) abandon whole regions to natural calamity and 4) vacation as the nation’s enemies plot and dawdled in a grade school as the nation is under domestic attack. Such incompetence is unimaginable that one is tempted to conclude it approaches willful neglect. Unwilling to seriously consider such as treasonous act, one is left to seriously contemplate the mental acumen of a President and its impact on the nation.

Given the age, etc. of John McCain and his likelihood of serving his full term, one must also consider the lack of experience and mental acumen of Ms. Sarah Palin. I seriously caution against a Republican vote this fall. It is not because I think she is unpatriotic or indecent, but she is far too great of a risk. The last 8 years of incompetence has brought us to this point. Four more may break us.

Oct. 09 2008 12:20 PM

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