Streams

America in the Age of Jackson

Wednesday, October 01, 2008

We look into why the years between 1815 and 1848 were such a tumultuous time in American history โ€“ and how the country dealt with controversies over slavery, capitalism, and urbanization. Historian and literary critic David S. Reynolds is the author of Waking Giant.

Event:
David Reynolds will be reading and signing books
Thurs. Oct. 2 at 7 pm
Upper West Side Barnes & Noble
2289 Broadway

Guests:

David S. Reynolds
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Comments [4]

eff

Thank you and your guest for such a wonderful segment, Mr Lopate.

Oct. 02 2008 04:23 PM
Bob Castillo from New York

Dr. Reynolds says he wrote this book--and not a biography of Jackson--because there has been no comprehensive study of the period.

Schlesinger's AGE OF JACKSON is a classic in the field, as is THE MARKET REVOLUTION by Charles Sellers. Howe's book WHAT HATH GOD WROUGHT, mentioned by other listeners, is probably the finest synthesis of the period I've ever seen, and it, like Schlesinger's book, won a Pulitzer. Has Dr. Reynold's never seen it?

Leonard Lopate asked a good question, but it's unfortunate, I think, that he didn't follow up.

Oct. 01 2008 02:14 PM
Henry from Katonah

Wait, Howe's book came out last year.

Oct. 01 2008 01:49 PM
Henry from Katonah

I am reading What Hath God Wrought by Daniel Walker Howe, which covers the same period as your guest's book. It also came out this year, but by Oxford University Press.
Howe goes to great lengths to dispute calling the period after Jackson, since the anti-Jacksonians were more influential than they get credit for. He suggests Henry Clay had almost equal stature and how unlucky - not his term - the Whig party was. Both of their elected presidents died and the VPs were not very carefully chosen. Has your guest seen Howe's book?

Oct. 01 2008 01:44 PM

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