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Thursday, September 25, 2008

Find out about some of the most exciting scientific research happening now! Also: Suzanne Farrell, one of the finest ballerinas of the 20th century. States of the Union is all about New Mexico. Marilynne Robinson on her new novel, Home. And on Underreported: why the NYC Housing Authority seems to be in bad shape.

Guests:

Suzanne Farrell and Marilynne Robinson

Top Scientists

We talk about some of the most exciting scientific research happening right now. Leonard talks to two Lasker Award winners: Stanley Falkow, who’s receiving the Lasker Special Achievement Award for his 51-year career as a top microbiologist, specializing in how harmful bacteria works; and

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Suzanne Farrell, Ballerina

Suzanne Farrell is one of the finest ballerinas of the 20th century, and founder of the Suzanne Farrell Ballet at the Kennedy Center in DC. She joins us to talk about how she recreated the lost Balanchine ballet of "Pithoprakta." Elisabeth Holowchuk is dancing ...

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States of the Union: New Mexico

In 2000, Al Gore won New Mexico by just 365 votes. We find out whether the margin of victory will be that narrow in 2008. Plus, a look at the race for Pete Domenici’s Senate seat. Joining us to explain what matters to voters in the Land of Enchantment is ...

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Marilynne Robinson’s New Novel

Marilynne Robinson talks about her new novel Home. It’s a companion piece to her earlier Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Gilead.

Event:
Marilynne Robinson will be at the 92nd St. Y
Thurs. Sept. 25 at 8:00 pm
Tickets and more info at 92Y.org

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Underreported: NYCHA’s Woes

The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) is the nation’s largest public housing authority. It’s also facing big troubles. It has a huge operating deficit on its budget, and is also dealing with rising fuel costs, deteriorating properties, and budget cuts. We look into how things got this bad, and ...

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