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It's Not Easy Being Green

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Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Eco-efficiency and corporate responsibility are just two of the ideas that have been touted as ways to slow global warming. Find out whether some of those proposed remedies could do more harm than good! Also: Dennis Lehane on his new novel. Flautist Sir James Galway, a.k.a. "Lord of the Flute." Plus, actor Robert Wagner talks about being mentored by Spencer Tracy, and his passionate love affair with Barbara Stanwyck.

Guests:

Sir James Galway, Dennis Lehane and Robert Wagner

Sustainability by Design

Ideas like eco-efficiency and corporate responsibility have been touted as ways to slow global warming. Find out why some of those proposed remedies could do more harm than good….and whether there are other, more effective solutions out there. John Ehrenfeld is a pioneer in the field of industrial ecology and ...

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Dennis Lehane's New Novel

Dennis Lehane’s new novel, The Given Day, is set in Boston during and after World War I. It follows an Irish family dealing with prejudice, the Spanish flu pandemic, the Boston police strike of 1919 and anti-union violence.

Event:
Dennis Lehane will be speaking and signing books

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Robert Wagner’s Hollywood’s Adventures

Actor Robert Wagner talks about what it was like to be mentored by Spencer Tracy, and be married to Natalie Wood. He also reveals details about the affair he had with Barbara Stanwyck when he was 22 and she was twice his age. His new memoir is

Comments [3]

Lord of the Flute

Belfast-born flautist Sir James Galway, a.k.a. “Lord of the Flute,” has sold more than 30 million records and recorded over 60 albums. His latest is “O’Reilly Street.”

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