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Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Find out how Dick Cheney shaped the vice president’s role in the White House even before he joined the ticket in 2000 - and whether he's changed the job description for future VPs. Also: Lin Ullman on her new novel, set on a tiny Swedish island. A look at the life and work of German renaissance artist Albrecht Durer. Plus, war correspondent Dexter Filkins on his work in Afghanistan and Iraq since 1998.

Guests:

Dexter Filkins and Lin Ullman

Cheney: A VP Like No Other

Find out how Dick Cheney shaped the vice president’s role in the White House even before he joined the ticket in 2000 - and how he’s changed the job description for future administrations. Barton Gellman is the author of Angler: The Cheney Vice Presidency.

Event:
Barton Gellman ...

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A Blessed Child

Linn Ullman’s a new novel, A Blessed Child, tells the story a blended family summering on a tiny Swedish island. Ullman is the daughter of Liv Ullman and Ingmar Bergman.

Event:
Liv Ullman will be giving a reading and signing books
Tues. Sept. 16 at ...

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Albrecht Durer: Art in Transition

German Renaissance artist Albrecht Durer’s work blended Flemish Gothic with Italy's innovations in perspective and color. The Museum of Biblical Art (MOBIA) is hosting an exhibit of his work called "Albrecht Durer: Art in Transition," on display through September 21. Paul Tabor is director of exhibitions at MOBIA; ...

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A War Correspondent

New York Times prize–winning reporter Dexter Filkins describes his harrowing work in Afghanistan and Iraq since 1998 - a very eventful period in both countries. He’s widely considered one of the best war correspondents of his generation, and his new book is The Forever War.

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