Streams

On Screen

« previous episode | next episode »

Tuesday, September 09, 2008

CBS News vet Bob Schieffer looks back on his 50-year journalism career, and ahead to Oct. 15 when he hosts the final debate between Obama and McCain! Also: Chris Eska's new film, "August Evening." Then, hear about a novel set in Civil War-era Georgetown. And join us for the latest in our Political Projections film series. We'll talk about how President Richard Nixon has been depicted by Hollywood.

Guests:

Chris Eska and Bob Schieffer

Bob Schieffer’s America

CBS News veteran Bob Schieffer shares his thoughts on war, political campaigns, and other headlines from his 50-year career in journalism – and looks ahead to the final presidential debate between Sen. Obama and Sen. McCain, which Schieffer will moderate on Oct. 15. His new book is Bob Schieffer’s ...

Comments [5]

An Undocumented Farm Worker’s Story

Director Chris Eska’s new film, "August Evening," tells the story of an aging undocumented farm worker and his young, widowed daughter-in-law as their lives are thrown into unpheaval. It’s now showing at the Village East Cinema (181 - 189 2nd Ave.).

Comments [1]

Post-Slavery Family Life

Breena Clarke’s new novel, Stand the Storm, revolves around the Coats family, a black family living in Georgetown around the time of the Civil War, and their struggles to free themselves from the legacy of slavery.

Event:
Breena Clarke will be reading from Stand the Storm

Comments [5]

Political Projections: Nixon in Hollywood

On Tues., Sept. 9, tune in for a discussion on how President Richard Nixon has been depicted by Hollywood. Leonard talks with journalist Rick Perlstein, author of Nixonland; and Brian Neve, a professor of cultural studies at the University of Bath in England and author of Film and ...

Comments [9]

News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.