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Jazz Can Change Your Life

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Tuesday, September 02, 2008

Wynton Marsalis explains why he says a better understanding of jazz music can improve your life. A look at photos of NYC in the 1960s and 70s. Plus, find out why standardized test prep companies like Kaplan are being brought into failing New York schools, and whether they're worth the high price tag. But first: more coverage of the Republican convention, live from the Twin Cities! We look at the complex relationship between Bush and McCain.

Join us for another Lopate Show film screening! On Monday, Sept. 8th, we'll be showing the 1976 film "All the President's Men" at Galapagos in DUMBO. Seating is limited, so RSVP soon!

Guests:

Wynton Marsalis

Bush, McCain, and Palin: Open Phones

We take your calls on the complex relationship between Sen. John McCain and Pres. George W. Bush, and whether McCain's selection of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin has changed your opinion of McCain's candidacy.

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How Jazz Can Change Your Life

Pulitzer Prize-winning musician and composer Wynton Marsalis says that understanding jazz can improve your personal life, your creativity, and even your career! His new book is Moving to Higher Ground: How Jazz Can Change Your Life.

Event:
Wynton Marsalis will be in conversation with Geoffrey C. Ward
...

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Photos from 1960s and 70s NYC

New York photographer Oscar Abolafia took over 300,000 photographs that captured the city in the 1960s and 70s. He's worked for 35 years as a photographer for Time, People and Look magazines.

Comments [3]

The Tyranny of the Test

The "No Child Left Behind" Act has created new business opportunities for standardized test companies like Kaplan, which has been brought into failing NYC schools at a price tag of tens of thousands of dollars per school. Former Kaplan tutor Jeremy Miller talks about what these programs are doing for ...

Comments [6]

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