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Monday, September 01, 2008

Hear the latest news on Hurricane Gustav. Also, States of Union is all about Minnesota. On Underappreciated, hear about Yuri Olesha’s 1927 work Envy. Plus, find out what you need to know about to toxic mold, and the health problems it can cause!

Gustav Update

John M. Barry, Secretary of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority East, joins us for a Gustav update, and tells us what Louisiana has learned from the Katrina disaster.

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States of the Union: Minnesota

As the GOP convention gets under way, we look at the politics of the host state, Minnesota. We find out why the race between Senator Norm Coleman and Al Franken is not as close as expected and what Minnesotans thought of all the buzz surrounding Gov. Tim Pawlenty as a ...

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Underappreciated: Yuri Olesha’s Envy

When it was published in 1927, Yuri Olesha's Envy was celebrated by the Soviet establishment as a condemnation of the bourgeois psyche. But two years later Olesha came under suspicion when Communist officials realized that the novel was a satire. Marian Schwartz, who translated Envy for the

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Toxic Mold

Find out what you need to know about toxic mold. Chemical/industrial hygienist Monona Rossol of Arts Crafts and Theater Safety and Dr. Eckardt Johanning of the Fungal Research Group explain the health effects of mold exposure, and why court cases involving toxic mold are very difficult ...

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