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The Train to Tibet

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Monday, August 11, 2008

The Chinese government’s ambitions are on full display now that the Olympics are underway. Find out how China’s nationalistic goals influenced its 50-year quest to build a railway into Tibet. Also, on our Underappreciated summer reading series: all about Memoirs of an Anti-Semite, Gregor von Rezzori's semi-autobiographical satire. Hear the story of the greatest manhunt of World War II. Plus, Pat Choate, Ross Perot's former running mate, on how the U.S. can survive globalization.

Guests:

Pat Choate

China's Great Train

The Chinese government’s ambitions are on full display now that the Olympics are underway. Abrahm Lustgarten talks about how China’s nationalistic goals influenced its 50-year quest to build a railway into Tibet. His new book is China’s Great Train: Beijing’s Drive West and the Campaign to Remake Tibet.

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Underappreciated: Gregor von Rezzori's Memoirs of an Anti-Semite

In Gregor von Rezzori's semi-autobiographical satire, Memoirs of an Anti-Semite, the narrator looks back on a lifetime of fascination with and hatred of Jews. Elie Wiesel has said that Rezzori's voice "echoes with the disturbing and wonderful magic of a true storyteller." Deborah Eisenberg, who wrote the introduction to ...

Comments [3]

The Greatest Manhunt of World War II

An American soldier sparked the greatest manhunt of World War II after he murdered his lieutenant and then escaped into the Indo-Burmese jungle. Brendan Koerner’s new book about the dramatic manhunt is Now the Hell Will start.

Comments [1]

Surviving Globalization

Pat Choate, Ross Perot’s former VP running mate, says that unfettered globalization is a major threat to American stability and prosperity. In his new book, Dangerous Businesss, he shares his thoughts on what the U.S. needs to do to remain sovereign, prosperous, and secure.

Comments [3]

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