Streams

Underreported: Sudan Update

Thursday, July 17, 2008

Georgette Gagnon, Africa program director for Human Rights Watch, gives us an update on the latest from Khartoum. We’ll talk about the ongoing proxy war between Chad and Sudan, and the recent ICC request for a warrant of arrest for Sudan’s president Omar al-Bashir on charges of ten counts of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes.

Guests:

Georgette Gagnon
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Comments [4]

Gary from New York City

This is the kind of story that makes me sick to my stomach. I would like to see someone, be it a voter posting a YouTube question, or a reporter, pose these issues in stark terms to our candidates and see what they have to say? Could there perhaps be some type of legislation which could be enacted to preclude American companies from investing in companies which do business in these countries? Could a tax of some sort be put on these companies? What would these candidates commit to?

Jul. 17 2008 02:03 PM
Albert from Greenwich, CT

BTW I got the info about that from

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gum_arabic#Political_aspects

I have fact checked it though and it seems acurate.

Jul. 17 2008 01:57 PM
Albert from Greenwich, CT

You guys are not speaking about the fact that Sudan is the single largest exporter of gum Arabic which is an important ingredient in soft drink syrups, hard gummy candies like gumdrops, marshmallows, M & M's chocolate candies, and chewing gum.

Jul. 17 2008 01:55 PM
Janet Becker from Manhattan

How can the USA be in a position of challenging the crimes against humanity which are occurring in other countries, when we, ourselves (i.e., the Bush administration), are so glaringly guilty of war crimes, torture, and covert activites in Iran and elsewhere?

Jul. 17 2008 01:55 PM

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