Streams

War and Peace

« previous episode | next episode »

Monday, July 14, 2008

The world is a very different place today than it was when the Peace Corps was founded in 1961. Former volunteers discuss what the program has accomplished and where it should go in the future. Also, how Native Americans in El Paso opposed plans for the largest bronze equestrian statute in the world. And a 43-year-old sportswriter’s year as a pro football player. Plus, Susanna White talks about directing HBO’s new miniseries “Generation Kill.”

Guests:

Susanna White

HBO’s “Generation Kill”

“Generation Kill” is a new seven-part HBO minseries created by David Simon and Ed Burns, the team behind “The Wire,” and adapted from the prizewinning book by Evan Wright. It looks at the experiences of an elite U.S. Marine company as they lead the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Susanna ...

Comments [1]

Past and Present Collide in El Paso

El Paso is home to the largest bronze equestrian statue in the world – of Spanish Conquistador Juan de Oñate. A new documentary, “The Last Conquistador,” recounts how the area’s Native Americans opposed the statue because of Oñate's 1598 foray into New Mexico that led to the deaths of ...

Comments [8]

The Future of the Peace Corps

The world is a very different place today than it was when the Peace Corps was founded in 1961 by President Kennedy. As it nears its 50th anniversary, former volunteers are looking at what the program has accomplished, and where it should go in the future. Kevin Quigley (Thailand 1976-9) ...

Comments [21]

Infiltrating the National Football League

After more than a year spent working out with a strength coach and polishing his craft with a kicking coach, Stefan Fatsis became a Denver Bronco! In A Few Seconds of Panic: A 5-Foot-8, 170-Pound, 43-Year-Old Sportswriter Plays in the NFL, he describes the challenges faced by pro athletes ...

Comments [2]

The Morning Brief

Enter your email address and we’ll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.