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Fighting for Change

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Monday, July 07, 2008

Former NPR correspondent Sarah Chayes gives us an update on the situation in Afghanistan. She’s witnessed first-hand the resurgence of the Taliban and the widespread corruption of the US-backed Karzai government. Also, the stories of individual reformers who are fighting unsuccessfully for political change in China. And Hao Jiang Tian on how he became the first world-class Western opera singer from China. Plus, Anthony Mann’s daughter talks about her father’s 1950 masterpiece, “The Furies.”

Guests:

Sarah Chayes and Hao Jiang Tian

Sarah Chayes With an Update on Afghanistan

Former NPR correspondent Sarah Chayes lives and works in Kandahar, Afghanistan, where she’s founded a soapmaking company, Arghand, to help rebuild the war-torn country. Ms. Chayes updates us on the resurgence of the Taliban and the widespread corruption committed by the Karzai government.

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From Mao to the Met

Hao Jiang Tian was twenty-years-old when he discovered his singing voice. Ten years later he was making his debut at the Metropolitan Opera! In his book, Along the Roaring River: My Wild Ride from Mao to the Met, Mr. Tian describes how he became the first world-class Western opera ...

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Anthony Mann’s “The Furies”

Hollywood craftsman Anthony Mann was at his creative peak in the western domestic melodrama, “The Furies” (1950). A new, restored transfer of the film has been released by The Criterion Collection. Nina Mann discusses her father’s masterpiece.

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Struggling for Reform in Modern China

Former Washington Post bureau chief in Beijing Philip Pan calls China’s political system the “largest and perhaps most successful experiment in authoritarianism in the world.” In Out of Mao’s Shadow: The Struggle for the Soul of a New China, he tells the stories of individual reformers who have pressed ...

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