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Mind the Gap

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Tuesday, June 10, 2008

We look at the complicated link between race and poverty, and what America’s public school systems can do to improve racial equity. Also: Jesuit priest Uwem Akpan on his debut short story collection. Turner Classic Movie host Robert Osborne on Asian-Americans in film. Plus, Debra Winger on how she’s created a life for herself beyond acting!

Check out Leonard's interviews with several of the 2008 Tony Award nominees!

Guests:

Uwem Akpan, Robert Osborne and Debra Winger

Can Public Education Save America’s Kids?

We look at the complicated relationship between race and poverty, and what America’s public school system needs to do in order to promote racial equity. Pedro Noguera is the author of The Trouble With Black Boys: And Other Reflections on Race, Equity, and the Future of Public Education.

Comments [16]

New Short Stories From a Jesuit Priest

Uwem Akpan is a Jesuit priest who was born in Nigeria and now teaches in Zimbabwe. His new short story collection is Say You’re One of Them.

Event: Uwem Akpan will be speaking and signing books
Tuesday, June 10 at 7 pm
Housing Works Book Store
...

Comments [3]

Robert Osborne on Race and Hollywood

Turner Classic Movies host Robert Osborne talks about TCM’s June special, "Race and Hollywood: Asian Images in Film," a 35-film retrospective with early depictions starring Anna May Wong to contemporary movies like "The Joy Luck Club."

Comments [11]

Debra Winger on Life Beyond Hollywood

Debra Winger explains how she’s resisted the all-consuming lure of Hollywood and created a life for herself beyond acting. Her new book, Undiscovered, weaves together memories, poetry, stories, and observation.

Comments [8]

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