Streams

Missing Persons

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Monday, June 09, 2008

Federal public defender Steven Wax says the U.S. government has ways of making a person disappear. He tells the frightening stories of two men who got caught up in post-9/11 counterterrorism measures. Also: Peter Matthiessen on his new novel. Ian Frazier’s latest collection of humorous essays. And find out how Muqtada Al-Sadr became the leader of Iraq's poor Shi'ites and the resistance to the occupation.

Guests:

Ian Frazier, Peter Matthiessen and Steven Wax

Caught Up in Post-9/11 Counterterrorism

Federal public defender Steven Wax warns that the U.S. government has ways of making a person disappear. He tells the frightening stories of two men who got caught up in post-9/11 counterterrorism measures. His new book is Kafka Comes to America.

Event: Steven Wax will be speaking and signing ...

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Shadow Country

The latest in author and naturalist Peter Matthiessen’s Watson trilogy of novels is Shadow Country. It’s set in the Florida Everglades at the end of the 1800s.

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Lamentations of the Father

Ian Frazier’s new collection of humorous essays is Lamentations of the Father.

Event: Ian Frazier will be in conversation with Leonard Lopate
Tuesday, June 10 at 8:15 pm
92nd Street Y
Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street
To purchase tickets, go here.

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The Rise of Muqtada Al-Sadr

Find out how Muqtada Al-Sadr became the leader of Iraq's poor Shi'ites and the resistance to the occupation. Journalist Patrick Cockburn’s new book is Muqtada.

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2008 Tony Award Nominees on the Leonard Lopate Show

Listen to Leonard's recent interviews with some of the 2008 Tony Award nominees!

Featured Actress (Musical)
Loretta Ables Sayre, Rodgers & Hammerstein's "South Pacific"
Andrea Martin, The New Mel Brooks Musical "Young Frankenstein"

Actor (Play)

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