Streams

How Cups Affect Taste

Thursday, April 17, 2008

The feel of the container affects the taste of the drink it contains, according to a recent study by Rutgers Associate Professor of Marketing Maureen Morrin (along with Aradhna Krishna of the University of Michigan). Morrin tells us what happened when they blindfolded people and then gave them water to drink from firm and flimsy plastic cups.

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Maureen Morrin
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Comments [4]

MD from ny

no big news in that the cup matters. It's been known for years. Her idea that she can assess the role of tactile sensation of touch when people are simultaneously having the unusual tactile sensation of drinking through a straw is absurd. Then to further discriminate between the tactile/sensitive is more absurd since they are the ones who would be more tactily stimulated by the straw.

Apr. 23 2008 09:32 AM
Jennifer H from NYC

When I was a kid my grandmother had these anodized aluminum cups they were colorful and when you put a cold drink in them the metal would get cold. They were amazing. i loved drinking out of them and as i recall there was a slight metal to the taste of the drink from them and I think it made me like them even better.

Apr. 17 2008 01:38 PM
anthony clune from Brooklyn

My ceramics teacher in Minnesota has been saying this for years.

Some potters would go as far as to claim that the plate you eat your food off of is more important than the fair itself... This might be pushing it... but the idea is that it is a spiritual thing.

Apr. 17 2008 01:34 PM
Paulo from Paterson, New Jersey

I HATE drinking water from a straw... I feel like there's more of a plastic taste (even moreso than drinking it from a plastic cup). Just water though. Juice, soda, etc. is no problem.

I've never noticed firmness of the container as being a real factor.

Apr. 17 2008 01:32 PM

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