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Slavery Is Not Dead

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Friday, March 28, 2008

There are more slaves in the world today than at any other time in history. Find out who and where those slaves are, and whether anything can be done to end slavery once and for all. Also: a new school in Baghdad that teaches Iraqis to tell their stories through film. A math professor explains how he calculates whether baseball players are worth their high salaries. And on Please Explain: how kids play make believe. Guest host Julie Burstein sits in for Leonard today.

Tune in for our latest Political Projections on Tuesday, April 1st! We'll talk about political idealism in Hollywood. We're also hosting a special film screening on March 31st. Seating is limited to the first 100 people who RSVP, so don't wait!

Guests:

Julie Burstein

Modern-Day Slavery

There are more slaves in the world today than at any other time in history. E. Benjamin Skinner, author of A Crime So Monstrous: Face-to-Face with Modern-Day Slavery, tells us who and where these slaves are, and whether anything can be done to end slavery worldwide once and for ...

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Iraqi Film Students

The Independent Film & Television College in Baghdad teaches young Iraqis how to tell their stories through film. Maysoon Pachachi is the school’s co-founder.

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Are Baseball Stars Worth Their Salaries?

University of Wisconsin math professor Jordan Ellenberg has calculated whether baseball stars are worth the huge salaries they get.

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Please Explain: Games of Make Believe

We look into how children play games of make believe, and whether kids’ imaginations have changed along with trends in technology and education. Dr. Susan Linn is Associate Director of the Media Center of the Judge Baker Children's Center, Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and the author of ...

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