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Friday, February 29, 2008

Find out how consumers and manufacturers have shaped the history of the car in America. Also: the upcoming Brooklyn Maqam Arab music festival, featuring local musicians playing in the traditions of countries like Egypt, Yemen and Tunisia. Then, a new documentary about the trial of the leaders of the 1968 protests during the Democratic convention in Chicago. And Please Explain is all about carbon footprints!

Check out the latest in our Political Projections film series! On Tuesday, March 4, we'll talk about how Hollywood has showcased American cynicism about politics. You can watch the films we've chosen and weigh in on the conversation.

The History of Cars in America

Find out how consumers and manufacturers have shaped the history of the car in the U.S. - from Henry Ford’s fascination with waste reduction, to the SUV craze of the 1990s. Tom McCarthy’s new book is Auto Mania: Cars, Consumers, and the Environment.

Weigh in: As a consumer, how ...

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Brooklyn Maqam Arab Music Festival

Many Americans aren’t familiar with the rich tradition of Arab music. The upcoming Brooklyn Maqam Arab music festival is trying to change that, with a lineup of local musicians playing in the traditions of countries like Egypt, Yemen and Tunisia. It runs March 2-30, at locations around the city. Dr. ...

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Chicago 10

Director Brett Morgen mixes animation, archival footage, and current music in his new documentary, "Chicago 10," which focuses on the trial of the leaders of the 1968 protests during the Democratic convention in Chicago.

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Please Explain: Carbon Footprints

"Carbon footprint" has become a catchphrase in the last year or two. We find out just what a carbon footprint is, how it’s calculated, and how much it matters. Mark Z. Jacobson is Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University and Catherine S. Norman is ...

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