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If Women Ruled the World

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Tuesday, February 26, 2008

Former White House press secretary Dee Dee Myers thinks that if women ruled the world, businesses would be more profitable, communities would be healthier, and politics would be more collegial. Also: acclaimed Nigerian authors Chinua Achebe and Chris Abani. And k.d. lang on her new album, "Watershed."

Check out the latest in our Political Projections film series! On Tuesday, March 4, we'll talk about how Hollywood has showcased American cynicism about politics. You can watch the selected films and weigh in on the conversation.

Guests:

Chris Abani, Chinua Achebe, Dee Dee Myers and k.d. lang

k.d. lang’s “Watershed”

k.d. lang’s new album, "Watershed," is her first recording of original songs in eight years. The Toronto Star recently called her "one of the most engaging performers on the planet."

Event: k.d. lang will be performing
Tuesday, February 26 through Thursday, February 28 at 8:30 pm
The Allen ...

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Chinua Achebe and Chris Abani

Chinua Achebe has been called the father of modern African literature. He’s here to celebrate the 50th anniversary of his famous novel, Things Fall Apart. And the acclaimed young Nigerian novelist Chris Abani talks about Achebe's influence on his own work.

Event: Chinua Achebe, Chris Abani, Toni Morrison, Chimamanda ...

Comments [2]

Dee Dee Myers on Why Women Should Rule the World

Former White House press secretary Dee Dee Myers thinks that women should rule the world. In her new book, Why Women Should Rule the World, Ms. Myers explains why she says that with women in charge, businesses would be more profitable, communities would be healthier, and politics would be ...

Comments [26]

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