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Wednesday, January 02, 2008

We say goodbye to 2007 with a look at the past year's most overrated movies....then welcome in 2008 with some predictions for the world in the year ahead. Also: a journalist explains why she thinks the risks of fatal food allergies have been greatly exaggerated. And find out how political narratives are created for the candidates.

Be sure to check out our new film series Political Projections! We're asking you to watch a few movies about campaigns, and then tune in on Jan. 8 to contribute to the discussion.

The Making of Political Narratives

The Iowa caucuses are tomorrow, and the candidates’ narratives about themselves and their ideals have already been mostly established. On the Media’s Brooke Gladstone and Paul Waldman, Senior Fellow at Media Matters for America, talk about how those narratives are made, why some stick and others don’t, and ...

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Everyone’s Gone Nuts About Food Allergies

The risk of food-related allergies has been greatly overblown, according to journalist Meredith Broussard (who’s had food allergies herself). Her article in the January issue of Harper’s magazine is "Everyone’s Gone Nuts."

Note: On Thurs., Jan. 31 at 12:40, we're doing a follow-up segment addressing listeners' concerns about ...

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Predictions for 2008

The Economist magazine’s Daniel Franklin makes some predictions for the year ahead in 2008. He says the dollar will continue to fall, and US relations with Iran could improve.

Weigh in: What are your predictions for the world in 2008?

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Most Overrated Movies of 2007

What were the most overrated films of 2007? Stephen Whitty, Chairman of the New York Critics Film Circle and Newark Star-Ledger critic, and Christian Science Monitor film critic Peter Rainer weigh in.

What do you think were the most overrated movies of 2007? Tell us by leaving a comment below.

Comments [57]

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