Streams

Listening to the Twentieth Century

Monday, October 29, 2007

New Yorker music critic Alex Ross analyzed 20th century music to write The Rest Is Noise, discovering some unexpected connections along the way. He explains the links between “West Side Story” and Arnold Schoenberg, and finds corresponding sounds in the music of Jean Sibelius and John Coltrane.

Purchase The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century at amazon.com.

Events: Alex Ross will be a guest for The Blue Notebooks Interviews series
Monday, October 29 at 8 pm
Columbia University,
Morningside Campus, Schermerhorn 501
For more information, email Linden Park at lp2196@columbia.edu or click here.

Alex Ross will take part in
An Evening of Spooky Modern Music
Tuesday, October 30 at 10 pm
The Paris Bar at the National Arts Club
15 Gramercy Park North
Tickets are $25 and can be purchased online here.

Guests:

Alex Ross
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Comments [1]

TM from Brooklyn

I want to thank Alex Ross for being such a smart and interesting speaker for music of the twentieth century and beyond.

Tonal music is based on natural phenomena that our ears easily comprehend, but that does not mean that other musics cannot be appreciated, enjoyed, even loved. The abdication of musical and arts education from an early age in our society is closing our eyes and ears at early ages to all outside a very narrow range of expression. Today's pop music tries to wear a mantle of rebellion and subversion, but is astonishingly conservative and unimaginative.

Oct. 29 2007 12:26 PM

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