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Staying Alive

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Thursday, October 18, 2007

A small number of patients infected with HIV have never gotten sick and require no medication. On today’s first Underreported feature, find out what doctors hope to learn by studying the immune systems of these patients, and how that could lead to new ways to treat and prevent HIV/AIDS. Then, the second part of Underreported looks into the situation of the American hostages that have been held for four years by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia. But first, Stephen King on this year’s best American short stories.

Guests:

Stephen King

Stephen King on The Best American Short Stories 2007

The Best American Short Stories series is now in its 30th year, so it's fitting that one of America’s most famous writers, Stephen King, has edited the 2007 edition. He joins Leonard to share stories that reflect his own personal touch, plus works from John Barth, T.C. Boyle, William Gay, ...

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Underreported: New Hopes for Treating HIV/AIDS

New hopes for treating HIV/AIDS lie in part with a group of people called "elite controllers," patients who have been infected with HIV for as many as 30 years -- without ever getting sick or needing medication. These patients are relatively rare, but researchers are trying to find out what ...

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Underreported: American Hostages in Colombia

The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) have been holding prisoners and hostages for years, including high-profile former Colombian presidential candidate Ingrid Betancourt, as well as three Americans who were captured after a plane crash in 2003. For the second part of today's Underreported, we'll look into who the hostages ...

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