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Thursday, October 11, 2007

Tim and Nina Zagat talk about their 2008 New York City restaurant guide. Then, Underreported looks at new meat inspection rules, how the use of growth-promoting antibiotics in poultry production may be ineffective and detrimental to human health, and a potential misuse of nanotechnology in washing machines.

Zagat 2008 New York City Restaurants

Tim and Nina Zagat join Leonard to talk about their Zagat 2008 New York City Restaurants. They’ll share some of the best new restaurants in New York City’s five boroughs, and which familiar names are still getting top ratings.

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Underreported: New Meat Inspection Rules

The farm bill passed by Congress in July contained a little-noticed provision that would eliminate a 40-year old requirement of federal inspection for meat and poultry sold across the United States. States would then have more authority to inspect meat and poultry. On today’s Underreported, Leonard speaks with Christopher Waldrop, ...

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Underreported: Poultry Antibiotics May Not Be Effective

An estimated 70 percent of all antibiotics sold in the United States are used on farms, mostly in animal feed. Health researchers have long worried that this heavy load of antibiotics is causing strains of bacteria to evolve that are impervious to the drugs. Plus, these resistant bacteria can pass ...

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Underreported: Nanosilver

The EPA recently issued a ruling that a Samsung washing machine must be regulated as a pesticide. That's because the washing machine, the "Silvercare" model, claims to kill germs by injecting 100 quadrillion silver ions into each wash load. The wastewater would be released into public water systems, and there ...

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