Streams

Playing Hardball

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Wednesday, October 03, 2007

On today’s show, Chris Matthews discusses what people in any field can learn from politicians about achieving success. Then, a look back at 25 years of Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave festival, and which innovative artists are participating this year. Also, what's at stake in the divisive debate over abortion. Plus, the gun empire of Justin Moon, the son of Reverend Sun Myung Moon, and the likely successor to lead the Unification Church.

Guests:

Chris Matthews

Chris Matthews on What We Can Learn from Politicians

Chris Matthews, host of MSNBC’s “Hardball,” explains how anyone can use the tactics of professional politicians to get ahead in their own careers in Life’s a Campaign. He writes about Bill Clinton’s laser-focused ability to listen to those he wanted to seduce, Ronald Reagan’s unyielding optimism, and Nancy Pelosi’s hardnosed ...

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Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival

The Brooklyn Academy of Music is celebrating its 25th Next Wave Festival, a 3-month celebration of cutting-edge works in music, theater, and dance. Since its inception, the festival has provided audiences with works by Philip Glass, Laurie Anderson, Robert Wilson, and Mark Morris. Joining Leonard to speak about the history ...

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The Abortion Debate

Ever since Roe v. Wade, the United States has been deeply divided on the issue of abortion. As the religious right has increased in size and power over the past decade, the debate has become even more divisive – and violent. Filmmaker Tony Kaye, best known for “American History X,” ...

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Kahr Arms and the Unification Church

In the October issue of Conde Nast Portfolio, Contributing editor Christopher S. Stewart goes inside the growing gun empire of Justin Moon, the C.E.O. of Kahr Arms, who’s also the son of Reverend Sun Myung Moon, the leader of the Unification Church. Kahr Arms is facing a landmark lawsuit for ...

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