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Hollywood Royalty

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Friday, September 07, 2007

On today's show: Academy Award winner Michael Douglas joins us to discuss his latest film, King of California. Then director Michael Verhoeven describes his new documentary about Germany's continuing struggle to understand Nazi atrocities. Also, a Newsweek writer explains how luxury goods became a $157 billion global industry. And on today's Please Explain, we’ll learn all about over-the-counter painkillers.

Guests:

Michael Douglas and Michael Verhoeven

King of California

Michael Douglas has gotten rave reviews for his role in the dark comedy King of California. He plays Charlie, a man just off a two-year stint in a mental institution trying to reconnect with his long-suffering teenage daughter. His schemes to reverse the family's fortunes bring them together, for better ...

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The Unknown Soldier

From 1999 to 2004, the Wehrmacht-Exhibition toured eleven German cities, reaching an audience of more than 500,000. The show shocked the nation by presenting documentary evidence that a large number of ordinary army soldiers, not just a fanatical minority in notorious SS units, were behind Nazi atrocities during World War ...

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Deluxe

In Deluxe, Newsweek writer Dana Thomas tells the stories behind the world's most famous luxury labels: how they came to be, why consumers love them, and where they fit in today's global economy.

Purchase Deluxe: How Luxury Lost Its Luster at amazon.com.

Weigh in: Have luxury goods lost their ...

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Please Explain: Over-the-Counter Painkillers

Americans spend more than $2 billion annually on non-prescription pain relievers. Today we'll find out what they are, how they work, how they differ from one another and from prescription drugs, what side effects they cause, and more. Rear Admiral Sandra Kweder, MD, deputy director of the Food and Drug ...

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