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Underappreciated

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Monday, September 03, 2007

On today's show: The final installment of our Underappreciated Literature series examines the work one of China's most widely read authors, Eileen Chang. And actor Bruce Dern looks back over his film career, including his experiences working with Alfred Hitchcock, Jack Nicholson, Paul Newman and Jane Fonda. Also, Michael Lerner tells the story of Prohibition in New York City. But first, ABC News correspondent Martha Raddatz reports on the lives of our soldiers at war abroad and their anxious families back home.

The Long Road Home

Before Martha Raddatz became the White House correspondent for ABC News, she covered the Pentagon. In her book, The Long Road Home, she tells the stories of the soldiers serving in Iraq and Afghanistan and the families waiting for them back in the United States.

Purchase The Long Road Home ...

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Underappreciated: Eileen Chang

Eileen Chang - also known as Zhang Ailing - is one of China's most widely read authors. After an unhappy childhood in Shanghai, she began publishing short stories as a college student in the 1940s. Her genius was recognized almost immediately, and there were soon rumors of her being considered ...

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Dry Manhattan

In his lively history of Prohibition-era New York City, Michael Lerner reveals some surprising ways the ban on booze affected social and political life in the Big Apple.

Purchase Dry Manhattan: Prohibition in New York City at amazon.com.

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Bite Your Tongue!

When actor Bruce Dern looks back over his film career, there are plenty of things he is glad to have done: working with Elia Kazan, Alfred Hitchcock, Jack Nicholson, Paul Newman, and Jane Fonda, for example. The title, Things I've Said, But Probably Shouldn't Have, alludes to a few things ...

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