Streams

The Worst Years of Your Life

Thursday, August 30, 2007

The Worst Years of Your Life says it all. The stories in this fiction anthology capture all the worst parts of adolescence – the angst, depression, puberty, and embarrassment. Adults can be thankful that these years are far behind them, and adolescents can be reassured that they’re not the only ones struggling. Editor Mark Jude Poirier and writers Victor D. LaValle and A.M. Homes weigh in on their worst experiences.

The Worst Years of Your Life is available for purchase at amazon.com

Tell us about the worst years of your life. Call us live at 212-433-9692 or post your comments here.

Weigh in: What is your worst memory from adolescence?

Guests:

A.M. Homes, Victor D. LaValle and Mark Jude Poirier
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Comments [8]

Roy

Adolescence was an extension of my bad childhood, kids not liking me and being good "friends" with the teachers. How pathetic.

The only upsides were getting rowdy kids into trouble and yelling at them if they were bothering me.

Also, go see the recent hit film, "Superbad". If you were a geek in high school, you'll relate to the three main characters.

Aug. 30 2007 02:24 PM
ch from NJ

I step mothered an adolescent girl (now 24).

She was a lot like me...testing the limits, going wild but (to my mind) not THAT wild.

Because we had a similar sensibility I was able to reassure her father that she wasn't going to go too far. She turned out a happy young woman.

Parents have to give some thought about how their values differ from those of their children when deciding how much to restrict their behavior.

Aug. 30 2007 01:54 PM
KP from NJ

I learned at 42 that I have asthma. I often wonder if I will wind up like Piggy.

Aug. 30 2007 01:48 PM
Christopher from Manhattan

Since adolescence is such a recent invention, it seems possible that there are people who so sill view it as a pleasant part of childhoood.

Some argue adolescence stretches into the early thirties, marking the later periods as the more difficult and awkward.

Finally how do your guests see the idea of adolescence shifting? Will it merge into the phases it seems now to be set off from?

Aug. 30 2007 01:41 PM
chestine from NY

i do remember an older cousin telling me not to worry, no worries, nobody is really cool till you get to college, so hang in through all the new tastes of life - i miss how automatic it was for me to run to the box of paints then. it might have been different but it was really creative for me.

Aug. 30 2007 01:37 PM
carolita from manhattan

I was shocked when my little brother told me his junior high years were the best years of his life, and that life was never as good since. My junior high years were the WORST years of my life, which means that even now that I'm 42, I STILL think life is getting better and better! When kids tell me they're having a hard time, I tell them it only means life is going to be better later, if not freakin' AMAZING!!!

Aug. 30 2007 01:22 PM
chestine from NY

issues of adolescence took a back seat for me - i grew up in an alcoholic household - teen angsts couldn't compare to that madness! Almost gotta be a Buddhist to detach from all that and avoid the anger it might inspire. A good thing is that it left me with a good sense of curiosity as little makes sense to me even now.

Aug. 30 2007 01:17 PM
Robert

High school was a bad experience for me. I had two of the most horrible teachers that you can imagine. They sort of ruined my life in that they were important for me to get into a good college. I found out later that they also affected other people in a negative way. This pivotal part of a young person's life can be ruined by jerks in the educational system. This experience affected my whole life.

Aug. 30 2007 12:30 PM

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