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Friday, August 03, 2007

A green thumb gives us his best tips for urban gardeners. Then, an Egyptian-American journalist recounts her family's journey from Cairo to New York. Also, the historian of Brooklyn's Green-Wood Cemetery illuminates the lives of Civil War veterans buried there. And on this week's Please Explain, we'll learn all about oceans.

How Does Your Garden Grow?

Whether you've got a window box in Manhattan or a sprawling backyard in Manhasset, horticulturalist Gerard Lordahl is here to help you get things growing despite the summer heat.

Visit the New York Council on the Environment.

Call us live on the air at 212-433-9692 or post your questions ...

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From Old Cairo to New York

Jewish communities have lived in Egypt since Biblical times, but political changes in the 1950s forced many to flee the once-cosmopolitan country. Lucette Lagnado's family lost everything when they escaped first to Paris and then to New York, and her once-glamorous father was never quite the same.

Her memoir The ...

Comments [3]

Final Camping Ground

When Green-Wood Cemetery historian Jeffrey Richman began researching Civil War soldiers buried there, he never expected to locate more 3,000 of them. His book and CD Final Camping Ground tells the stories of these brave men in their own words, via letters, journals, and battlefield reports.

Purchase Final Camping Ground ...

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Please Explain: Oceans

Ever wonder why the surf is up or the tides are out? On today's Please Explain, Dr. William B. F. Ryan of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Dr. Paul Falkowski of Rutgers University will answer your questions on everything from algae to undertow.

Call us live on the air at ...

Comments [3]

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