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On the Road: China Edition

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Wednesday, July 25, 2007

On today’s show: NPR's Rob Gifford discusses his 3,000 mile journey through China and the ordinary people he met along the way. Then: Billy Joe Shaver explains why he’s released a spiritual album. Also, Yale Law professor and writer, Stephen L. Carter talks about his second novel. Plus, word maven Patricia T. O’Conner explains how new words get into the dictionary.

Guests:

Stephen L. Carter, Rob Gifford, Patricia T. O'Conner and Billy Joe Shaver

A Journey through China

Globalization is bringing China’s booming cities and tiny towns into closer commercial and cultural proximity. And the lure of wealth is radically changing the character of China. National Public Radio foreign correspondent Rob Gifford set out to explore how ordinary Chinese people are coping with these changes. China Road chronicles ...

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Honky Tonk Gospel

Billy Joe ShaverJohnny Cash called Billy Joe Shaver “my favorite songwriter.” Shaver has written songs for Cash as well as Bob Dylan, Elvis Presley, Waylon Jennings, Kris Kristofferson, and others. His new album, “Everybody’s Brother,” will be released on August 7. ...

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New England White

Stephen L. Carter is a Yale law professor, social and legal policy writer, columnist, and novelist. Two characters from his bestselling first novel, The Emperor of Ocean Park, take center stage in his newest book, New England White. Like his debut, Carter blends suspense and mystery with complex discussions of ...

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Word Maven Patricia T. O’Conner

Word maven Patricia T. O’Conner explores how new words get into the dictionary and responds to listener mail. She then answers your questions about the use (and misuse) of the English language. Call 212-433-9692 or post a question or comment during the show. If your question isn’t answered on air, ...

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